The EcoWongs

Thoughts, Aspirations, and Projects of the Wong Clan

How many doughs can you start at once? February 26, 2009

I don’t know what the real answer is, but I’d imagine that it’s somewhere around

Sourdough Pizza Dough

Sourdough Pizza Dough

Sourdough Raisin Bread

Sourdough Raisin Bread

Sourdough Challah

Sourdough Challah

Sourdough Waffles

Sourdough Waffles

Contending with an overflowing jar of starter, we decided to start a few things, but every recipe that we started called for very little of the starter (~25 grams) except the last one.

The recipes for the waffles (the only completed project thus far) is as follows (via Northwest Sourdough):

A tasty Sourdough Waffle recipe.
Makes approximately 10 – 8 inch round waffles.

Add together in first bowl:

  • 2 cups sourdough starter
  • 1 cup milk(or instead, use one cup warm water + 1/2 cup dry milk)
  • 4 beaten eggs
  • 3 Tablespoons sugar or use 2 Tablespoons of malt syrup
  • 1 cube butter melted, cooled slightly or 1/2 cup of oil

In second bowl mix together:

  • 2 &1/2 cups of all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder

Stir the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients, add more water if batter is too thick (waffle batter needs to be on the thin side but not too thin! ). Heat your waffle iron to it’s hottest setting, because sourdough needs really hot temps, cook, enjoy!

We fiddled with this recipe a bit.  We mixed the starter, milk, eggs, butter, flour, and salt together, and replaced the malt syrup with brown rice syrup.  We let that rise overnight and added the baking soda and powder the next morning.  These waffles were very bready and the “oven” spring was remarkable.  So much so that the iron started to open!  All told, it made 21 square waffles (the recipe says 8-10 round ones).  We’ll definitely try it again, perhaps with a bit more salt, 1 less egg, and more butter (did anyone else not know that 1 cube of butter = 1/4 stick?)

Stay tuned for more updates about projects 1-3.

Advertisements
 

Bread, bread and more bread. February 23, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 7:50 pm
Tags: , , ,

In my attempts to perfect the sourdough loaf, I am continually baking.  My latest attempt:

another 5-grain sourdough loaf.  This time, it ended up extremely wet and sticky, so I ended up adding a lot of extra flour.  Result: a very very large loaf.

another 5-grain sourdough loaf. This time, it ended up extremely wet and sticky, so I ended up adding a lot of extra flour. Result: a very very large loaf.

The finished product.  It ended up being pretty big around, but not very tall.  Probably due to the long rise, all the oomph had been taken out of the starter (plus, by the time it got around to baking, the flour to starter ratio was way off)

The finished product. It ended up being pretty big around, but not very tall. Probably due to the long rise, all the "oomph" had been taken out of the starter (plus, by the time it got around to baking, the flour to starter ratio was way off)

Up close, you can see the sunflower seeds embedded in the dough.

Up close, you can see the sunflower seeds embedded in the dough.

First slice.  Good looking crumb. Very tasty, too.

First slice. Good looking crumb. Very tasty, too.

How big was this loaf, do you ask?

It was biiiiiiig.

It was biiiiiiig.

 

City Bread with 20% Whole Wheat Flour February 20, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 10:10 pm
Tags: , ,

City Bread with 20% Whole Wheat Flour, originally uploaded by Emmett’s Parents.


Feeling adventurous, I decided to replace 4 out of 20 oz. of the flour in the Cheeseboard Collective’s City Bread recipe with King Arthur’s Whole Wheat flour. It’s still very tasty, and the whole loaf has taken on a nice tan.

 

A word on feeding your starter… February 19, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 8:03 am
Tags: ,

I did a little research and asking around, and I found out that I’d been feeding my starter incorrectly.  This is the formula that I found:

Hydration percent = (water / flour) * 100

For you non-engineers, consider your water weight (not volume) to be 100%.  Whatever weight of flour you put in there will be the hydration percentage of your starter.  Soooo……

If i wanted a 100% hydration starter, then I would start out with whatever volume of water I wanted to add.  This morning, I started with 8 oz. of water (I used my kitchen scale).  To that, I added 6 oz. of white King Arthur AP flour, and 2 oz. of Arrowhead Mills Rye Flour, to total 8 oz. of flour.  The consistency of the result was like a thick pancake batter:

Stir in your existing starter and you will get something akin to a quickbread batter:

This is a 100% hydration.  If you wanted an 80% hydration, which would be considerably thicker, you would put in 80% as much flour as you did water.  So, for the 8 oz. of flour I put in, I would have added 6.4 oz. of water (80%=6.4/8 * 100).

I know… math wasn’t my strong suit either.

 

5 Grain Seeded Sourdough (modified) January 30, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 7:54 am
Tags: , ,

Following a recipe found on The Fresh Loaf, I tried my hand at a 5-Grain Seeded Sourdough.  But when I looked at my local Trader Joe’s, Ralph’s, and Albertson’s, I couldn’t find the 5-grain cereal that the recipe calls for, nor could I find pumpkin seeds.  Improvising, I made the soaker out of 4 oz rye flour, 2 oz sunflower seeds, and 1 oz rolled oats.

Other modifications: I proofed the dough for over 24 hours to make it more palatable for a certain toddler’s digestive system.

Pictures!

This is the dough after I had put it to the first rise:

After 12 hours of rising, I folded it over:

this is the dough that had been rising for over 12 hours, after I had folded it over.

I put it in my banneton (which I’m loving, it’s the 2nd time I’ve used it), and this is how I found it this morning:

After 45-50 minutes at 450:

We couldn’t resist and we had to try it (it’s so good, Emmett immediately asked for more):

Thanks for the recipe!  I’ll definitely be trying it again with the proper ingredients.

 

What do you do with leftover dough? January 27, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 9:04 pm
Tags: , , ,

I made another round of English Muffins (this round turned out much better than the last), but I ended up with a ball of dough that I didn’t quite know what to do with.  So I began to improvise.

I kneaded it down and cut a bunch of little english muffins (bite size) and cooked those up as per the larger ones.  The remainder of the dough I formed into a little boule, and pressed some thyme, parsley, and basil into the crust.  All of these went into the oven and we crossed our fingers.

The result:

And the english nuggets:

The little loaf was pretty tasty, but the crumb didn’t quite have the “spring” that my loaves usually do.  As for the nuggets, I should have stayed the course and kept them in the pan.  By placing them in the oven, I turned them into little pebbles.  The inside is nice and fluffy, but the crust is pretty dang hard.

Oh, well. Waste not, want not.

 

English Muffins! January 22, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — gnowetan @ 9:57 am
Tags: , ,

Using the sourdough master, I decided to try cheeseboard’s english muffins. I was pleasantly surprised.

Take half of the dough and flatten it into an 8x10x3/4 inch rectangle (about the size of a sheet of paper)

Let it rest for 15 minutes.  Take a cup, cookie cutter, or a biscuit cutter and make six muffins.

Place muffins on a baking sheet that is dusted with 2 tbs of cornmeal

Cover and let them rise for about 2 hours in a warm, draft-free place.  Cheesboard says to use a floured towel, but I think it’s better to use either saran wrap or a wet towel.  Otherwise, the dough will dry out.

After the muffins have risen by about 1/4 and a finger pressed into them leaves an indentation, preheat a griddle or cast iron pan on medium/low heat.  After it is preheated, dust with 2 tbs of cornmeal.

Turn the muffins into the pan so that the top is on the bottom and the bottom is on the top (you want cornmeal on all sides).

Cook the muffins for about 8-10 minutes on both sides, or until they get that nice golden brown that we all love our english muffins to have.  Monitor the heat so that the muffins or the cornmeal won’t burn.

Finished Product:

And they are oh-so-good.